Tutorial

iZotope ~ Ozone 8 ~ Vintage Compressor, Dynamics, Dynamic EQ & Spectral Shaper


Timecode

00:04 = Overview
00:16 = Vintage Compressor
04:17 = Dynamics
08:32 = Dynamic EQ
11:07 = Spectral Shaper

Summary

iZotope's Ozone 8 is an extremely robust application that offers just about every mastering tool you might need all in one spot. It can function as it’s own standalone application where you can import audio files for mastering, or as a virtual audio effect inside of your DAW, like you see here in Ableton.

In this video, I walk through Ozone 8's Vintage Compressor, Dynamics, Dynamic EQ & Spectral Shaper.

Thank you for watching and don't forget to RTFM!



iZotope ~ Ozone 8 ~ EQ, Vintage EQ, Vintage Tape & Exciter


Timecode

00:04 = Overview
00:17 = EQ
06:54 = Vintage EQ
07:55 = Vintage Tape
10:12 = Exciter

Summary

iZotope's Ozone 8 is an extremely robust application that offers just about every mastering tool you might need all in one spot. It can function as it’s own standalone application where you can import audio files for mastering, or as a virtual audio effect inside of your DAW, like you see here in Ableton.

In this video, I walk through Ozone 8's EQ, Vintage EQ, Vintage Tape and Exciter.

Thank you for watching and don't forget to RTFM!



iZotope ~ Ozone 8 ~ UI Overview & Master Assistant


Timecode

00:04 = Overview
00:32 = Module Controls
01:28 = General Controls
02:33 = Preset Manager
03:40 = Master Assistant

Summary

iZotope's Ozone 8 is an extremely robust application that offers just about every mastering tool you might need all in one spot. It can function as it’s own standalone application where you can import audio files for mastering, or as a virtual audio effect inside of your DAW, like you see here in Ableton.

In this video, I walk you through the UI and some of the more general controls and I also walk through how to use Ozone 8's new feature, Master Assistant!

Thanks for watching and don't forget to RTFM!



Ableton Live 9 ~ Grain Delay


Timecode

00:19 = Overview
00:44 = Delay Time, Dry/Wet, Feedback
02:43 = Spray, Frequency, Pitch, Random Pitch
05:02 = X-Y Controller

Summary

Ableton Live's Grain Delay gives us the ability to slice our input signal into tiny particles (called "grains") and then individually delay and re-pitch those particles.

On top of that, Grain Delay allows us to add a bit of randomness to our delay and pitch, which can produce a complex tail like texture that is 100% unique from the original sound.



A Mathematical Approach To Sidechaining


Summary

In this How To tutorial, Mr. Bill demonstrates an advanced way to calculate and determine your sidechain compression release times. Be sure to visit his website to download and dissect this project file and many more!



Introduction To Sound Design


Summary

Sound design is the process of specifying, acquiring, manipulating or generating audio elements.

But what does that actually mean? Well… since Sound Design is utilized in a plethora of ways, the term itself can take on many different meanings within the wonderful world of audio.

To simplify the true meaning of “Sound Design”, I explore all the different mediums in which it’s practiced and then breakdown all the different ways we can practice it. This includes exploring sound design within film & television, live performances, video games and of course music.



Ableton Live 9 ~ Simpler


Timecode

00:18 = Overview
01:55 = Classic
04:25 = Warp Modes
12:56 = 1-Shot
14:15 = Slice
17:58 = Context Menu
20:16 = Controls Tab (Filter, LFO, Pitch Env)

Summary

"Simpler is an instrument that integrates the basic elements of a sampler with a set of classic synthesizer parameters.” - Ableton Reference Manual

Ableton’s Simpler may look less powerful than sampler, but unlike Sampler, Simpler allows us slice up and time warp our samples so that we can play them back much more creatively.

Good luck with your Simpler endeavors and don't forget to read the f***ing manual!



5 Ways To Make Your Sounds WIDER


Summary

In this "How To" video, Will from EDMTips.com shares 5 different ways you can widen your sounds stereo field. He also shares a bonus tip for widening your drum sounds!

Be sure to check out Will's channel "EDM tips" for more videos like this one.



Cableguys ~ ShaperBox


Timecode

00:28 = Overview
01:09 = General UI
03:23 = TimeShaper + Multi-band Controls
05:51 = TimeShaper + Waveform Editor
10:31 = TimeShaper + LFO Controls
13:43 = FilterShaper
15:06 = PanShaper
17:33 = VolumeShaper
22:17 = WidthShaper

Summary

CableGuys ShaperBox is an all in one solution for pumping life into your static sounds. This effect allows you to edit your audio signals frequency content, volume, stereo field and timing all in one spot.

And because you can draw in custom shapes for each effect, you can add precise beat synced movement to your audio signal with ease. Oh, and you can do all of this in a multi-band fashion as well.

Most of the time I’m reaching for this effect, when I want to disrupt my audio or give it some extra flavor. Also, I do want to mention that Cableguys offers each on of these effects on their own, but the ShaperBox allows you to utilize them all in one spot, which is pretty awesome and convenient.



Parallel Compression


Summary

Parallel Compression is a mixing technique aimed to reduce the dynamic range of an audio signal. It’s also commonly referred to as New York Compression.

Normally when we’re talking about compression, we’re talking about downwards compression. This is when we make the louder parts of an audio signal quieter, reducing the dynamic range so we can increase the overall volume.

Another way to reduce dynamic range is to use upwards compression. This is when we make the quieter parts of our audio signal louder, accomplishing the same results.

Parallel Compression however is just a slightly different way to practice upwards compression. But instead of using a compressor to apply upwards compression directly to our audio signal, we instead duplicate our audio signal and apply heavy downwards compression to that duplicate and proceed to mix it back in with our untouched original signal.

The overall results will indeed reduce the dynamic range, but without sacrificing our delicate transients which can sometimes get obliterated when trying to downward compress our way through the loudness war.



How To Be A Layer Slayer


Timecode

00:21 = Overview
01:46 = Layering Synths
05:10 = Layering Drums

Summary

Layering multiple synth patches or multiple drum samples is nothing more than a multi channel version of additive synthesis.

Normally when you think of additive synthesis, you think of mixing saw waves with triangle waves with sine waves and so on. And you may already be DOING THIS in a handful of plugins. But that is just the beginning.

I look at layering as the final stage of sound design. Sure you can design cool sounds exclusively within plugins like Serum, Massive or Sylenth1 and you can call that a finished product. But honestly you’d be cutting yourself short if you didn’t dream within the dream. Yes, I’m talking about Sound Design inception.

So when you look at additive synthesis with that perspective, there is an infinite amount of combinations to be had between different synth patches and samples. And that to me is the essence of sound design.



Cableguys ~ Curve 2


Timecode

00:25 = Overview
01:18 = Waveform Editor
08:59 = Oscillators
11:37 = Filters
13:10 = Envelopes
16:40 = LFOs
19:50 = Modulation Matrix
23:10 = Unison & Glide
26:10 = Macros
28:54 = Global Controls

Summary

Curve is a simple yet very powerful soft synth with an easy to use waveform editor that allows you to create custom waveforms in the blink of an eye. Dooooon’t bliiink. It also provides a handful of modulation controls, including 4 LFOs and 2 beat synced envelopes. If you like to twist knobs and experiment, this synth is your best friend.



Ableton Live 9 ~ Tension


Timecode

00:24 = Overview
01:15 = Excitator
07:38 = String
10:36 = Vibrato
12:19 = Damper
16:44 = Termination
18:47 = Pickup
19:36 = Body
22:05 = Filter, Envelope, LFO
26:40 = Keyboard, Unison, Portamento, Volume

Summary

Ableton Live’s "Tension is a synthesizer dedicated to the emulation of string instruments” - Ableton Reference Manual

The synth is constructed using Physical Modeling Synthesis, which depends on mathematical equations to emulate real life string instruments. It’s very flexible and with a little experimentation you can produce much more than your traditional string instrument sounds.

In this RTFM! Tutorial, I walk through every single knob and slider. Be sure to follow the timecode navigation to jump into different sections of the tutorial.

And as always, read the f***ing manual! :)



Volume Automation Without Headaches


Timecode

00:14 = Overview
01:17 = Track Volume
02:56 = "Volume Regular" Rack
04:47 = "Volume Filter" Rack

Summary

In this How To tutorial, I demonstrate a few different techniques in which you can automate volume inside of Ableton Live.

I present the downfalls of using the track volume slider and present a few alternatives. Check out the link below to download the audio effect racks seen in the video



Ableton Live 9 ~ Redux


Timecode

00:17 = What is Sample Rate? Bit Resolution?
01:34 = Downsample
03:49 = Bit Reduction

Summary

Ableton Live’s Redux "reduces an audio signal’s sample rate and bit resolution” - Ableton Reference Manual

To understand this a little bit better, let’s briefly explain what sample rate and bit resolution actually mean. 

Sample Rate refers to the number of times an analog audio signal is digitally represented per second. Bit Resolution, or bit depth, refers to available range at which an analog audio signal’s amplitude is digitally stored and represented. But with Redux, the name of the game is reducing sample rate and bit resolution so we can degrade our audio.

Thanks for watching this Ableton tutorial. Good luck with your Redux endeavors! And don't forget to RTFM!



Ableton Live 9 ~ Resonators


Timecode

00:16 = Overview
01:11 = Filter
01:35 = Resonators I, II, II, IV & V
04:31 = Mode, Decay, Const & Color
05:58 = Global

Summary

Ableton Live's Resonators "consists of five parallel resonators that superimpose a tonal character on the input source." - Ableton Reference Manual

It allows you to morph and mutate your incoming audio signal's timbre by adding harmonics, both above and below the original pitch. It's also very well known for producing string like sounds. All of this is achieved by tuning the 5 "resonators" by semitones relative to the fundamental frequency.

In this tutorial, I show you how to use each parameter and also give examples as to when it might be beneficial to use Ableton's Resonators. I hope this video brings you value. Good luck with your Resonators endeavors.

And as always, Read The F***ing Manual! :)



Ableton Live 9 ~ Vinyl Distortion


Timecode

00:22 = Overview
01:31 = Tracing Model
02:54 = Pinch
05:25 = Crackle

Summary

Ableton Live's Vinyl Distortion emulates common distortion effects that may occur on real life vinyl records during playback. More specifically, the distortion that occurs between the needle of a record player and the groove of a vinyl record. The effect also offers a crackle generator that produces noisy artifacts.

In this tutorial, I explain how to use every parameter within Vinyl Distortion. I explain Tracing Model and Pinch, which will add some distortion to our signal. And then I explain how to use Crackle, which will add some noise to our signal.

Good luck with your Ableton Live Vinyl Distortion endeavors!

And as always.... READ THE F***ING MANUAL!



Ableton Live 9 ~ Vocoder


Timecode

00:16 = Overview
01:38 = Carrier
07:00 = Unvoiced
07:56 = Filter Banks (Giant Display)
12:44 = Additional Parameters

Summary

"A vocoder is an effect that combines the frequency information of one audio signal (called the carrier) with the amplitude contour of another audio signal (called the modulator)." - Ableton Reference Manual

So the carrier is what dictates when audio gets played and at what pitch it gets played at. And the modulator dictates or shapes the amplitude of that audio (also thought of as the rhythm of the audio). And of course they get combined.

In most cases the carrier is an external synth and the modulator is a vocal. And most of the time the actual vocoder effect is applied to the modulator source (aka the vocal channel) while the carrier source (aka the synth channel) is usually muted, but routed and working within the vocoder effect.

For this tutorial, I use the vocoder effect on a Cash Cash - Take Me Home acapella. I walk through every single parameter in extreme detail. By the end of the tutorial, you should be able to start using Ableton Live's vocoder in your own productions.

Good Luck! And don't forget to read the f***cking manual!



Serum ~ Rendering & Resampling


Timecode

00:10 = Overview
00:24 = Rendering
03:14 = Resampling

Summary

The only Menu options we have yet to cover are the Rendering and Resampling options. These options serve as the final way we can create custom wavetables in Serum. And actually, they might be the quickest and easiest way.



Serum ~ Importing Audio


Timecode

00:10 = Overview
02:01 = Import: Normal (Dynamic Pitch Zero-Snap)
02:36 = Import: Normal (Dynamic Pitch Follow)
02:52 = Import: Constant Framesize (Pitch Avg)
03:52 = FFT Import Options
06:25 = Cleaning Up Our Imported Audio
11:44 = Best Practices For Importing Audio
17:29 = Importing PNGs

Summary

Serum’s capability to create custom wavetables at the expense of importing external audio is quite amazing. It allows for maximum customization and flexibility. It literally blows off the ceiling of any sound design limitations you may have thought you had.

So when we talk about importing external audio into Serum, we’re mainly talking about importing a multi-cycle waveform. But we have to remember that Serum is not a sampler and won’t play back our multi-cycle waveforms in the traditional way of a sampler. Instead, Serum will attempt to slice our multi-cycle waveform into individual single cycles, or frames, and then it will loop those single cycle waveforms at the speed of our incoming MIDI notes. 

Again, this is the essence of wavetable synthesis. Check out the beginning of the wavetable oscillators lesson if you need a refresher.